Encompassing islands in the Caribbean and both American continents, the Queen’s Baton has traversed arguably the Commonwealth’s most diverse region to rally excitement for the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games (GC2018).

Poles apart in their geography, economy and culture, it’s their shared passion for sport which unites the six nations and territories of the Americas.

The Baton first featured in the Americas as a symbol of hope and inspiration when the region’s young elite athletes came together at the Commonwealth Youth Games (CYG) in the Bahamas.

Canadian boxer Jordan Mathieu met his match in Guyana’s Keevan Allicock in the flyweight semis, a unique opportunity for two fighters from very different nations to learn from each other’s techniques and styles. These young athletes are now training to qualify for GC2018.

Boasting four medals, Bermuda’s most successful CYG team ever had the privilege of delivering the Baton from the Bahamas to their pretty island home in the north Atlantic.

The Queen’s Baton Relay spent the day in the sparsely-populated areas of Guyana inhabited by mainly indigenous communities. This QueenÕs Baton Relay will visit all 70 nations and territories of the Commonwealth, over 388 days and cover 230,000km. It will be the longest Relay in Commonwealth Games history, finishing at the Opening Ceremony on the Gold Coast on 4th April 2018. Photograph shows Luana Allicock, an indigenous resident of the village of Surama from the Mukushi tribe pictured with the Baton during a visit to the local community.

From there, the Baton hit the cosmopolitan streets of Toronto, Canada, before it was whisked away to Hamilton, the founding city of the first Commonwealth Games in 1930, then known as the British Empire Games. A daily westward migration across the continent took the Baton through previous host cities Edmonton (1978), Victoria (1994) and Vancouver (1954). Every day an opportunity to look back and pay homage to Canada’s athlete alumni and the cities that helped shape their careers.

From concrete jungles to the Amazon, in Guyana it was time to embrace the Relay’s values of inclusiveness and sustainability. The Makushi tribe welcomed the Baton on World Indigenous Day with a smoking ceremony, poetry, song and dance. The Baton also highlighted Guyana’s Kaieteur Falls, the longest single drop waterfall in the world and a part of Guyana’s premier protected areas.

The Queen’s Baton Relay spent the day in Georgetown the Capital City of Guyana and at nearby Essquibo on the first full day of a three-day visit to the country. This Queen’s Baton Relay will visit all 70 nations and territories of the Commonwealth, over 388 days and cover 230,000km. It will be the longest Relay in Commonwealth Games history, finishing at the Opening Ceremony on the Gold Coast on 4th April 2018. Photograph shows two young people with the Baton as it visited the National Track and Field Centre in Essquibo.

 

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